April 2, 1954: A couple is photographed moments after learning that their 19-month-old child had been swept out to sea. That morning, Times photographer Jack Gaunt was at his home when he heard a neighbor shout, “Something’s happening on the beach!” Gaunt grabbed his Rolliflex camera and headed toward the shoreline. His photograph appeared on the front page of The Times the next day. The image won the 1955 Pulitzer Prize for press photography; the Pulitzer committee called the photo “poignant and profoundly moving.” But for Gaunt, the image was hard to bear at first, his daughter recalled in Gaunt’s 2007 Times obituary.

April 2, 1954: A couple is photographed moments after learning that their 19-month-old child had been swept out to sea. That morning, Times photographer Jack Gaunt was at his home when he heard a neighbor shout, “Something’s happening on the beach!” Gaunt grabbed his Rolliflex camera and headed toward the shoreline. His photograph appeared on the front page of The Times the next day. The image won the 1955 Pulitzer Prize for press photography; the Pulitzer committee called the photo “poignant and profoundly moving.” But for Gaunt, the image was hard to bear at first, his daughter recalled in Gaunt’s 2007 Times obituary.

(via cityyandcolour)

9,072 notes

(Source: consumerbehaviourself, via justjessiica)

244,557 notes

aquaticwonder:

All reaching to one point

<3

aquaticwonder:

All reaching to one point

<3

(via urbanlandscapes)

160 notes

It&#8217;s like they&#8217;ve captured the stars and put them in cages.

It’s like they’ve captured the stars and put them in cages.

(Source: orionfalls, via urbanlandscapes)

89,685 notes

jennifer-wang:

I was thinking about fictional character crushes and went around trying to find pictures/stills for Roger Radcliffe (101 Dalmatians) and Dean McCoppin (The Iron Giant) and came across these. I was pleasantly surprised by how similar their living spaces were (records lying about, tea/coffee cups stacked everywhere, clocks that presumably neither of them really pay attention to, loose sheets of paper everywhere, egregious smoking habits, and jazz), but then I remembered that they are set only a few years apart—101 is in the early ’60s and Giant is in 1957—and they’re both artists (one a musician and the other a sculptor). Two sides of the same Atlantic coin.

(Also: Dean pays the bills as a junkyard owner, but what does Roger do for a living? It’s never explicitly stated how he makes money, but my headcanon is that he writes jingles for commercials—like Kanine Krunchies.)

(via khaedin)

1,614 notes

No.69

Someday soon, I will learn to let go of the bitterness and regret in my heart. 

1 note

poetsorg:

Corner Couple / 2007 / 8”x10 by James Gallagher.

poetsorg:

Corner Couple / 2007 / 8”x10 by James Gallagher.

60 notes

No.68

PET PEEVE: When I’m getting all excited planning for my future, dreaming about all the potential it holds, and someone comes along and says:

"Well, there’s no way you can really know any of that until the time comes." 

Buzzkill.

Planning is an act of creating and realizing. It is not some ill-informed attempt at being psychic on my part. I don’t claim that everything will happen smoothly and according to schedule. I just like to know that my life has direction, and that I am the primary determinant of that direction. 

But there are some people who don’t have the guts to try as hard to shape the course of their lives, and consequently feel powerless, swept around by the current of it. These are the people that have no confidence in their own agency, and as a result, want me to abandon any confidence I have in my own.

These are the people that try to get me to give up, give in to apathetic inaction. To just throw my hands up and cynically agree with them. “You know, you’re right,” they want to hear. “Let’s just sit here and wait for things to happen to us, and never believe that we can do something ourselves. Never believe that we should work towards anything because since we don’t know every minute detail of what the future holds, we should just stop there, and not even try to imagine.

To the “adults”, who told me to stop dreaming so big because I’ll inevitably be disappointed;

To the others who told me not to get too involved in romantic relationships, because “you don’t know if you’ll really end up with that person anyway”;

To the people who are too afraid to plan past lunch, afraid to get hurt, afraid of the bitter aftertaste of having too much ambition, afraid to meet life as an equal and demand its cooperation;

I say,

To get anything done, you have to acknowledge the unknown. You must meet fear. You have to hold onto fear. And in holding onto it, pin it down.


2 notes

wait what?is this real life? 

wait what?
is this real life? 

(Source: alexaomame, via sickxgirl)

1,418 notes

jungleindierock:

Beatles lyrics. Just for fun!

jungleindierock:

Beatles lyrics. Just for fun!

(via bookish-thoughts-deactivated201)

110 notes

(Source: daronnefcy, via penguinly-social-awkward-deacti)

14,271 notes

(via khaedin)

187,719 notes

BBC Coverage of the 2012 London Olympics with Benedict Cumberbatch

(via crieffandcrowley-deactivated201)

50 notes

theniftyfifties:

Polish ‘Love in the Afternoon’ film poster, 1959.

theniftyfifties:

Polish ‘Love in the Afternoon’ film poster, 1959.

1,259 notes

I Once Dated A Writer and

Writers are forgetful,

but they remember everything.
They forget appointments and anniversaries,
but remember what you wore,
how you smelled,
on your first date…
They remember every story you’ve ever told them -
like ever,
but forget what you’ve just said.
They don’t remember to water the plants
or take out the trash,
but they don’t forget how
to make you laugh.
.
Writers are forgetful
because
they’re busy
remembering
the important things.

(via chrisfox)

403,363 notes